ACLL2017


Conference Theme: “Educating for Change”

May 11–14, 2017 | Art Center Kobe, Kobe, Japan

acll-programme-2017-COVER

Whether we are looking at why we must change, how education has changed or even how education will change, change affects all of us involved in language education in many ways. Administrators, teacher trainers, teachers, students: we all wear many hats and we all come face-to-face with change, sometimes on a daily basis. Positive change is about improvement: improving proficiency, improving lives, helping learners achieve their goals and dreams and, ultimately, broadening horizons.

In our work as educators we are often asked to effect change – that we are change-makers can be seen in the new curriculums, new material, and even new techniques or methods that we develop. For those of us who conduct research, our research is often focused on finding “better” or more effective ways of teaching, often measured in outcomes such as “students entered with an average of X and improved to an average of Y”. In such a case, improvement = change. But change is also an area of research, as can be seen by looking at journals such as the Journal of Educational Change, Changes in Higher Education, Culture and Change, and Educational Research for Social Change, to mention four. It is a serious area of study, and one worth our attention.

The focus of the last journal mentioned above is worth looking at. Change is not only about test scores or proficiency going up. It is also about lasting change in one’s life, life choices, and looking beyond us as individuals to the society we live in. Social change and a focus on improving the societies we live in is another outcome of education. In recent years, there has been a focus on language and identity, as well as an embrace of sociocultural theory and language development.

At the same time change for the sake of change is not a good reason for change. There is often a tension between the status quo (which is not always bad) and the desire to change. As invested members of our field, we need to be able to examine change, identifying and applying that which is appropriate and will further our goals while also having the wisdom and gumption to reject change that does not make sense. As Dewey said, “Reforms which rest simply upon the enactment of law, or the threatening of certain penalties, or upon changes in mechanical or outward arrangements, are transitory and futile.”

And so we welcome you to this year’s conference, where we can examine change in ways that are important to each of us. What are its challenges, its complexities and its constraints? It is electrifying to think about the wide-ranging conversations we will have as we consider how we can go about educating for change the world over.

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Programme

  • Beyond web 2.0: Designing authentic mobile learning for everyday contexts in Asia
    Beyond web 2.0: Designing authentic mobile learning for everyday contexts in Asia
    Keynote Presentation: Professor Mark Pegrum
  • Assessment Basics for the Language Classroom: A Crash Course in Testing
    Assessment Basics for the Language Classroom: A Crash Course in Testing
    Featured Presentation: Brandon Kramer
  • Balancing Principles and Practicalities When Designing and Implementing a Vocabulary Program
    Balancing Principles and Practicalities When Designing and Implementing a Vocabulary Program
    Featured Presentation: Stuart McLean
  • How to Use Wikipedia as an Educational Tool in the Classroom
    How to Use Wikipedia as an Educational Tool in the Classroom
    Featured Presentation: Nichole Saad
  • Instructional Designers as Agents of Change: Facilitating the Next Generation of Technology-Enhanced Learning
    Instructional Designers as Agents of Change: Facilitating the Next Generation of Technology-Enhanced Learning
    Featured Presentation: Professor Barbara Lockee
  • Change in Japanese Tertiary Education: Implementing Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in Japan
    Change in Japanese Tertiary Education: Implementing Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in Japan
    Keynote Presentation: Professor Ted O' Neill

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Speakers

  • Professor Mark Pegrum
    Professor Mark Pegrum
    The University of Western Australia, Australia
  • Professor Barbara Lockee
    Professor Barbara Lockee
    Virginia Tech., USA
  • Nichole Saad
    Nichole Saad
    Wikimedia Foundation
  • Stuart McLean
    Stuart McLean
    Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Brandon Kramer
    Brandon Kramer
    Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Professor Ted O’Neill
    Professor Ted O’Neill
    Gakushuin University, Japan

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Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The Asian Conference on Language Learning (ACLL) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, etc.; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and oversee the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Professor Barbara Lockee
    Professor Barbara Lockee
    Virginia Tech., USA
  • Professor Ted O’Neill
    Professor Ted O’Neill
    Gakushuin University, Japan
  • Dr Eric Hawkinson
    Dr Eric Hawkinson
    The University of Fukuchiyama, Japan
  • Professor Steve Cornwell
    Professor Steve Cornwell
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Professor Neil McClelland
    Professor Neil McClelland
    University of Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Dr Joseph Haldane
    Dr Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Professor Sean O’Connell
    Professor Sean O’Connell
    Nanzan University, Japan

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Review Committee

  • Dr Amerrudin Abd Manan, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dr Arif Sariçoban, Hacettepe University, Turkey
  • Professor Benny Lee, Sim University, Singapore
  • Professor Chia-Ling Hsieh, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
  • Dr Daniel Velasco, Chicago School of Professional Psychology & Rikkyo University, Japan
  • Dr David Litz, Emirates College for Advanced Education, United Arab Emirates
  • Professor Djamiah Husain, State University of Makassar Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Dr Duc Huu Pham, Vietnam National University, Vietnam
  • Dr Elena Prats, Kyoto University, Japan
  • Dr Engku Haliza Engku Ibrahim, International Islamic University Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Dr Hsiu-Ling Hsu, Kun-Shan University, Taiwan
  • Dr Laleh Moghtadi, Islamic Azad University, Nourabad Mamasani Branch, Iran
  • Dr Lucía Pintado-Gutiérrez, Dublin City University, Ireland
  • Dr Ludwig Tan, Sim University, Singapore
  • Dr Manizheh Alami, Salalah College of Technology, Oman
  • Dr Michele Eduarda Brasil De Sá, University of Brasília, Brazil
  • Dr Myrna Labesig-Macalinao, Leyte Normal University, The Philippines
  • Dr Raees Unnisa, BSSS Bhopal, India
  • Dr Saadia Elamin, Prince Sultan University, Saudi Arabia
  • Dr Yin Ling Elaine Ng, Southern University of Science and Technology of China, China
  • Dr Yun-Fang Sun, Wenzao Ursuline University of Languages, Taiwan

IAFOR's peer review process, which involves both reciprocal review and the use of Review Committees, is overseen by conference Organising Committee members under the guidance of the Academic Governing Board. Review Committee members are established academics who hold PhDs or other terminal degrees in their fields and who have previous peer review experience.

If you would like to apply to serve on the ACLL Review Committee, please send your CV to acll@iafor.org.

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Beyond web 2.0: Designing authentic mobile learning for everyday contexts in Asia
Keynote Presentation: Professor Mark Pegrum

When the second generation of the web, or web 2.0, emerged around 2000, it opened up the possibility of promoting personalised but collaborative learning. A new generation of mobile context-aware technologies has now emerged, which builds on web 2.0 but goes beyond it, opening up the possibility of foregrounding authentic learning in everyday contexts. To capitalise on this new potential for educational change, it is essential to develop appropriate mobile learning designs. Drawing on Pegrum’s (2014) 3-Level Mobile Learning Framework, Burden & Kearney’s (2017) Mobile Pedagogical Framework, and Clandfield & Hadfield’s (2017) Weak & Strong Interaction Model, this paper suggests that today’s optimal mobile learning designs should involve activities where the devices, the learners, and the learning experiences are all mobile; where the three dimensions of personalisation, collaboration, and authenticity are foregrounded; and where both weak and strong interaction are present. The paper will illustrate the potential of mobile augmented reality (AR) language and literacy learning projects, most of which also incorporate elements of community building and cultural exploration. The main focus will be on recent gamified learning trails in Asia, such as the Singaporean AR Heritage Trails and the Hong Kong AR TIEs (Trails of Integrity and Ethics), where students learn collaboratively in real-world settings, while practising language, developing digital literacies and 21st century skills, building community, and exploring culture. We will consider how these gamified trails are structured to enable students to draw the greatest learning benefits from digitally supported, authentic, real-world interactions.

Read presenter biographies on the 2017 Speakers page.

Assessment Basics for the Language Classroom: A Crash Course in Testing
Featured Presentation: Brandon Kramer

Everyone remembers the stress of taking tests when they were students. Whether for placement purposes, measuring classroom learning, diagnosing content weaknesses or measuring overall proficiency, tests are an embedded and unavoidable part of teaching. Maximizing their potential should be a goal of every teacher and administrator.

This presentation will outline how tests can be used to check how much students have learned throughout a semester, as well as how they can help encourage the students to reach new levels. Different kinds of tests as well as recommended test-making strategies will be introduced, in addition to a discussion of the concepts of validity, washback and fairness. Focus will be given to considering the purposes of testing, the kinds of questions used, and basic results analysis. It is hoped that participants will gain an understanding of how tests can be used as a tool to promote learning in the classroom.

Read presenter biographies on the 2017 Speakers page.

Balancing Principles and Practicalities When Designing and Implementing a Vocabulary Program
Featured Presentation: Stuart McLean

The presenter will explain characteristics that make up an effective and efficient vocabulary program. These include spaced rehearsal, adaptive learning, increasing retrieval difficulty, the use of an appropriate counting unit, the presentation of both audio and orographic forms, and the use of context and the learner’s L1. However, while designing a vocabulary program that meets all of these criteria is simple, the operationalization of a vocabulary program designed in line with research literature is problematic.

The later half of the presentation describes the challenges faced when trying to implement the planned vocabulary program first across a new program, and then across of most of the institution. The presentation concludes by describing the achievements and limitations of the vocabulary program, and by making recommendations for others who hope to create a similar program.

Read presenter biographies on the 2017 Speakers page.

How to Use Wikipedia as an Educational Tool in the Classroom
Featured Presentation: Nichole Saad

Imagine a classroom in which all students are engaged, learning subject content, improving their digital literacy, and gaining valuable twenty-first-century skills while contributing to a global volunteer based movement. The Wikipedia Education Program is a win-win-win. Educators achieve learning targets, students gain valuable skills and Wikipedia gains content. This workshop will introduce the Wikipedia Education Program and demonstrate to educators how to begin using Wikipedia in the classroom. Instead of students writing a research paper for their teacher’s eyes only, students write for the world.

Read presenter biographies on the 2017 Speakers page.

Instructional Designers as Agents of Change: Facilitating the Next Generation of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Featured Presentation: Professor Barbara Lockee

The demand for instructional designers in educational settings is stronger than ever, as institutions seek to leverage the use of technology across learning contexts – in classrooms, online, and everywhere in between. But are schools and colleges ready for innovation in learning? Where are we as designers headed as a profession and how do those who employ us see our role in advancing their organisations? How will our skill sets and responsibilities need to change in light of these perspectives? This session will explore the changing landscape for instructional design professionals in educational contexts and our potential to serve as change agents in the adoption of learning innovations.

Read presenter biographies on the 2017 Speakers page.

Change in Japanese Tertiary Education: Implementing Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in Japan
Keynote Presentation: Professor Ted O' Neill

Higher education in Japan is going through a period of profound change. As universities attempt to respond to the needs of students and society, some are looking abroad for new approaches. One example is a recent surge in interest in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in tertiary education. This is closely related to government initiatives for globalisation in education, competition amongst universities for both local and international students, and growth of English Medium of Instruction (EMI) at the undergraduate level. These pressures will also be familiar to university educators around Asia and elsewhere. CLIL offers an approach to preparing students to study specific academic content while also improving language skills. However, much of the early work in developing CLIL took place in European primary and secondary education, so how does CLIL fit in this new environment? The understanding and application of this approach necessarily changes as it travels to other contexts, but its implementation promises deep effects on the identities of learners and institutions.

Read presenter biographies on the 2017 Speakers page.

Professor Mark Pegrum
The University of Western Australia, Australia

Mark Pegrum is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Education at The University of Western Australia, where he specialises in mobile learning and, more broadly, e-learning. His current research focuses on mobile technologies and digital literacies. His recent books include: Brave New Classrooms: Democratic Education and the Internet (co-edited with Joe Lockard; Peter Lang, 2007); From Blogs to Bombs: The Future of Digital Technologies in Education (UWA Publishing, 2009); Digital Literacies (co-authored with Gavin Dudeney and Nicky Hockly; Pearson/Routledge, 2013); and Mobile Learning: Languages, Literacies and Cultures (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). He is an associate editor of the International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments, a member of the Editorial Boards of Language Learning & Technology and System, and a member of the Review Panel of the International Journal of Pedagogies and Learning. He teaches in Perth, Hong Kong and Singapore.


Previous Presentations

Keynote Presentation (2017) | Beyond web 2.0: Designing authentic mobile learning for everyday contexts in Asia
Professor Barbara Lockee
Virginia Tech., USA

Biography

Dr Lockee is Professor of Instructional Design and Technology at Virginia Tech., USA, where she is also Associate Director of the School of Education and Associate Director of Educational Research and Outreach. She teaches courses in instructional design, message design, and distance education. Her research interests focus on instructional design issues related to technology-mediated learning. She has published more than 80 papers in academic journals, conferences and books, and has presented her scholarly work at over 90 national and international conferences.

Dr Lockee is Immediate Past President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, an international professional organisation for educational technology researchers and practitioners. She earned her PhD in 1996 from Virginia Tech in Curriculum and Instruction (Instructional Technology), M.A. in 1991 from Appalachian State University in Curriculum and Instruction (Educational Media), and BA in 1986 from Appalachian State University in Communication Arts.


Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Instructional Designers as Agents of Change: Facilitating the Next Generation of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Nichole Saad
Wikimedia Foundation

Biography

Nichole Saad is currently the Education Program Manager at the Wikimedia Foundation, and previously worked for the UNESCO Office in Amman and the Ministry of Education in Malaysia. She earned an MA from the George Washington University, USA, in International Education, focusing on Teacher Professional Development, Education Technology, International Development, and Education in Emergencies. Her current work at the Wikimedia Foundation allows her to pursue all of these academic interests while working towards a world where the sum of all human knowledge is free and accessible to everyone.


Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | How to Use Wikipedia as an Educational Tool in the Classroom
Stuart McLean
Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Stuart McLean is an instructor at Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan. He holds an MScEd (TESOL) and a PGCE, and is a doctoral student in Applied Linguistics at Kansai University. He has published in the journals Reading in a Foreign Language, Vocabulary Learning and Instruction, Language Teaching Research, TESOL Quarterly, Language Assessment Quarterly and Applied Linguistics.


Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Balancing Principles and Practicalities When Designing and Implementing a Vocabulary Program
Brandon Kramer
Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Brandon Kramer is a full-time lecturer of English and Interdisciplinary Studies at Osaka Jogakuin University in Western Japan, and also teaches at Kansai University. He has been teaching English in Japan since 2006, after studying mathematics for his undergraduate degree. After receiving an MS in TESOL from Temple University, Japan, he has published and presented on topics in vocabulary acquisition, language testing and corpus linguistics. He is currently focusing his PhD studies on the intersection of these three disciplines, seeking ways to bring the most up-to-date research into the classroom.


Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Assessment Basics for the Language Classroom: A Crash Course in Testing
Professor Ted O’Neill
Gakushuin University, Japan

Biography

Ted O’Neill is a professor at Gakushuin University, Tokyo. He recently held the position of Associate Professor of English in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Tokyo Medical and Dental University. Previously, he taught in the English Language Program at J. F. Oberlin University where he also served as Coordinator for the Foundation English Program. Ted was co-editor of The Language Teacher for the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) and currently serves on the JALT National Board of Directors as Director of Public Relations. He received an MA in ESL and Bilingual Education from the University of Massachusetts/Boston, USA. Ted joined the Apple Distinguished Educator Program in 2011 and completed a postgraduate Certificate of Educational Technology and Information Literacy through the Graduate School of Education at the State University of New York in 2014.

Professor Ted O’Neill is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR. He is a member of the Educational Technology section of the International Academic Advisory Board.


Previous Presentations

Keynote Presentation (2017) | Change in Japanese Tertiary Education: Implementing Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) in Japan
Professor Barbara Lockee
Virginia Tech., USA

Biography

Dr Lockee is Professor of Instructional Design and Technology at Virginia Tech., USA, where she is also Associate Director of the School of Education and Associate Director of Educational Research and Outreach. She teaches courses in instructional design, message design, and distance education. Her research interests focus on instructional design issues related to technology-mediated learning. She has published more than 80 papers in academic journals, conferences and books, and has presented her scholarly work at over 90 national and international conferences.

Dr Lockee is Immediate Past President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, an international professional organisation for educational technology researchers and practitioners. She earned her PhD in 1996 from Virginia Tech in Curriculum and Instruction (Instructional Technology), M.A. in 1991 from Appalachian State University in Curriculum and Instruction (Educational Media), and BA in 1986 from Appalachian State University in Communication Arts.


Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Instructional Designers as Agents of Change: Facilitating the Next Generation of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Professor Ted O’Neill
Gakushuin University, Japan

Biography

Ted O’Neill is a professor at Gakushuin University, Tokyo, in the Faculty of International Social Sciences. He previously taught at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and J. F. Oberlin University. Ted was co-editor of The Language Teacher for the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) and later served on the JALT National Board of Directors as Director of Public Relations from 2012 to 2016. He received an MA in ESL and Bilingual Education from the University of Massachusetts/Boston, USA in 1996 and completed a postgraduate Certificate of Educational Technology and Information Literacy through the Graduate School of Education at the State University of New York in 2014. He is a part of a research group studying implementation of content-based language education and content and language integrated learning in East and Southeast Asia with the generous support of The Research Institute for Oriental Cul­tures at Gakushuin University.​

Professor Ted O’Neill is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR. He is a member of the Educational Technology section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Dr Eric Hawkinson
The University of Fukuchiyama, Japan

Biography

Born in Wisconsin and raised in the deserts of Arizona. Having a professional background in IT Eric is taking everything ‘techie’ and turning it towards educating students. He now works and lives in northern Kyoto prefecture, Japan currently focusing on games based learning, electronic informal learning environments and eTourism. For the last few years Eric has been innovating ways to apply augmented reality to a variety of fields including tourism and education.

Professor Steve Cornwell
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Steve Cornwell is the President of IAFOR, and President of the Academic Governing Board. He coordinates and oversees the International Academic Advisory Board, and also serves on the organization's Board of Directors.

Dr Cornwell is Professor of English and Interdisciplinary Studies at Osaka Jogakuin University, and also teaches in the online portion of the MA TESOL Programme for the New School in New York. He helped write and design several of the New School courses and has been involved with the programme since its inception.

He has also been involved with the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), (an affiliate of IAFOR) serving on its National Board of Directors as Director of Programme from 2012-2016; where his duties involved working with a volunteer team of 50+ to put on JALT’s annual, international conference each autumn.

Most recently, since 2012, he has been the Committee Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s Lifelong Learning Committee and is responsible for their evening extension Programme geared towards alumni and community members. He is also the Vice-Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s English Education Committee which is responsible for suggesting policy regarding English Education and also responsible for developing material for the integrated curriculum.

Professor Neil McClelland
University of Kitakyushu, Japan

Biography

Neil McClelland is an Associate Professor in the Center for Fundamental Education of the University of Kitakyushu where he teaches undergraduate courses in Academic English. He has been teaching at university level in Japan for more than twenty years and was previously a lecturer at the University of Occupational and Environment Health (UOEH). His research interests focus on the application of Psychology in Applied Linguistics with a special emphasis on second language acquisition (SLA), language learning motivation (L2M), and computer assisted language learning (CALL). Recent publications relate to mixed-methods investigation of language learning motivation in Japanese tertiary education, and the application of Self-Determination Theory in promoting autonomous learning as a route to success. Neil actively presents at International Conferences around the world and is currently a submissions reviewer for several leading academic journals.

Dr Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and a Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within the university.

He is also a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

A black belt in judo, he is married with two children, and lives in Japan.

Professor Sean O’Connell
Nanzan University, Japan

Biography

Dr O’Connell is currently Associate Professor at the Faculty of Policy Studies, Nanzan University, Japan. He earned his PhD in 2011 from the University of Queensland, Australia, in Intercultural Communication. He teaches courses in intercultural business communication and understanding, Japanese-English interpreting and communication skills. His research interests include intercultural workplace communication, intercultural communication curriculum design and teacher training.